Oral Diabetes Pills

Facts About Oral Diabetes Pills

Oral Diabetes PillsWhat are diabetes pills?

These pills are designed with people that are afflicted with Type 2 Diabetes. They ARE NOT insulin, and there are five separate classes of oral diabetes pills:

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  • Sulfonylureas; these groups of oral diabetes pills enables the human body to distribute more of it’s own insulin. It also plays two more important roles. It stops the liver from putting stored glucose into your blood and helps your body to respond more favorably to insulin.
  • Biguanides; these types of diabetes pills causes the liver to release stored glucose slower. Similar to sulfonylureas, it allows your body to react to insulin while keeping glucose levels even.
  • Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors; these classes of diabetes pills are further broken down to acarbose (Precose) and glyset (Mighitol). These inhibitors work in the intestines by slowing the time that carbohydrates are transformed into glucose. The end result is that glucose enters you blood slower than usual, leveling out the peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels. Acarbose is used mainly around meals due to the spikes in your glucose at that time.
  • Thiazolidinediones; this class of oral diabetes pills enable your muscle cells to become more sensitive to insulin. The other functions serve to reduce the release of stored glucose by the liver. The FDA recommends a liver function test before using this type of oral medication because of the possibility of liver damage.
  • Meglitinides; this type of diabetes pills also helps the human body distribute more of its own, naturally produced insulin. It also aids to lower your blood glucose levels. These pills are fast acting and are mean to be taken with or before meals. This action keeps glucose levels from rising fast and peaking after substantial meals.

Be sure to read our other articles on diabetes and skin care.

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